Sunday, November 18, 2012

DELECTABLE SPECTACLE!

It's closer than you might think....  and it's the only holiday market you will need to visit, trust me.


Friday, November 2, 2012

Sorrel Jam


As I promised, here's the sorrel jam "recipe".  Since I made this after making jelly, there was an awkward messy stage where I was plucking the seeds pods of the sorrel out of the goopy seedy petally glop that I had in the jelly bag.  There was still enough liquid in there that I didn't feel like I need much more, but I did end up rinsing some of the seeds, poured the liquid through a large-hole sieve, and probably added about 1 cup more water that way.    (If you just wanted to make jam without the previous jelly step,  I would suggest just breaking the petal off the seeds while fresh and cooking them with a 1 cup of water per pound of petals til they were falling apart and mushy, probably about 15 minutes, more or less).

Once I had just petals, I added sugar to taste (a lot).  I'd say about 1/2 cup per cup of sorrel, but I didn't measure.  I just stirred it in until it tasted pretty sweet, but with a tiny bit of tart.


Then I boiled away, stirring often, for about 10 minutes.  I didn't wait for it to jell or anything, since it was already so thick and since I'd just seen what the jelly did, I wasn't concerned with its performance.  It did not end up being super jelled, but it is a nice spreadable thickness...



Process the jars the same way I did with the jelly.  From the original 5 pounds, the jam made an additional 6 half pints, but I would guess, maybe, you would get a higher yield if skipped the jelly step?




Thursday, October 25, 2012

Fake Blood


I mean, Sorrel Jelly.



When Mike and I were in the beautiful island of Dominica way back in 2010, we drank lots of Sorrel Tea, also known as Christmas Tea.  I smuggled some seeds across the border for my mother, she tried to grow them, the Caribbean seeds were unhappy in our frigid climate, but she was smitten with sorrel so she kept trying....


She grew some last year- but just a measly few.  I got a tiny jar of dried petals for Christmas, which I saved and saved until I squandered them on Pink Lemonade for some event or 'nother.  This year, it's a different story.  She grew a whole row, leaving me plenty to play with.  



Sorrel is more commonly known 'round these here parts as Hibiscus, or Cranberry Hibiscus.  Or Roselle.  I prefer to call it Sorrel, because that's how I was introduced, but it is not to be confused with the french sorrel of sorrel bisque.   This sorrel has a very cranberry-esque flavor, and is wonderful as a warm or chilled tea- especially with ginger.   It is also related to okra, and I had been hearing rumors of its okra-like slime and goo.  Well sir, the rumors are true.  Imagine okra slime, but pleasantly tart, and one of the most gorgeous colors in the world.  


It takes a lot of sorrel to make a batch of jelly, but it takes no store-bought pectin.  This is the first jelly I've ever made.  After I made the jelly (five pounds of sorrel to six half pints of jelly!) I had all the spent fruit petals which I turned into six more half pints of jam.  I had to laboriously pick the seed pods out, but it was worth it as I almost like the jam more than the jelly.  (keep on the lookout for the jam recipe, she'll be coming)

blood and guts

It is important to do this when you have a lot of time and sorrel on your hands.  The 

                                           drip 
                                                      dro
                                                                 p
                                                                          ping 

                              takes a 
              long 
                    long 
                           time









Sorrel Jelly makes 6 half pints, or 3 pints
takes about 4 hours

you will need
  •  a jelly bag OR a large tea towel
  • something to hang this tea towel/jelly bag from (I finally figured out a use for my above-the-stove-microwave)
  • large, wide, shallow non-reactive pan
  • canning pot for hot-water bath
for the jelly:
  • 5 pounds of sorrel fruit- seed pods included.  I picked the petals from the seeds, which helps a lot if you are planning on making jam as well
  • 7 cups water
  • 5 cups sugar (maybe a little less if you'd like- feel free to taste as you go)
Put the sorrel fruit and seeds in a large pot with the water. The water will not cover, you want to make a rich extract.  Cook over medium heat, stirring often, til the fruit is soft and the seed pods begin to become translucent.  This should take about 10-15 minutes, depending on how fresh the fruit is.  When the petals are soft, pour everything into a jelly bag, or a colander lined with a large tea towel.  I used a tea towel  and had to be very careful that the short edges did not slip under.  I then used a rubber band to secure it into a "bag" before I tied string around it and rigged it up to the handle of my microwave, allowing it to drip into a bowl placed below.  Experienced jelly-ers will no doubt have a hook and a jelly bag ready.

Allow juice to drip til no more drops out.  Do not squeeze, as this could make the jelly cloudy.  I did massage the bag about 2 hours in, just to loosen things up in there.  This juice is very viscus, so there will be no steady stream, but you will know when it's stopped dripping.  Mine took about 3 hours.

Pour juice into your wide, shallow pan and add the sugar.  Heat very low and stir to dissolve every last bit of sugar before you bring it to a boil.  Turn heat high to boil, and then turn heat down to maintain  gentle boil for about 10-15 minutes, or until a bit of jelly dabbed on a chilled plate from the freezer wrinkles slightly when pushed with a finger.  I actually never got to this stage- but it was thick and goopy, so I took my chances.  I cooked it for about 15 minutes, and although it never properly wrinkled, it had some give, so I just went ahead and canned it.  The leftover bit I refrigerated and it set within an hour.  

Sooo, when the jelly has gotten to the point you feel good about, pour boiling water over new canning lids you have placed in a heat-proof bowl.  Then ladle jelly into hot jars that have been boiled in a hot water bath for about 10 minutes, and are waiting patiently in warm water.  Make sure all the rims of the jars are clean (wipe with a damp paper towel or clean dish towel if needed), place on lids and tighten just til finger tight.  Place jars in a warm water bath and boil for 10 minutes to process.  Remove jars from water and let sit for 12 hours without jostling.  Check for un-sealed jars after a few hours and refrigerate any you find (I hardly ever find any).



And there you have a right proper jelly.....

Monday, August 6, 2012

Super Summer at Velo Coffe



July 28  2012

To Start

Rising Fawn Gardens Edamame


Vegetable Sushi
    with Signal Mtn. Farm basil, Crabtree Farm summer squash 
& Sequatchie Cove beets


Baba Ganoush 
with Pocket Farm eggplant & parsley

Sequatchie Cove Beet Dip

......
Gazpacho
with Sequatchie Cove tomatoes, Fall Creek Farm cucumbers, 
Pocket Farm sweet peppers ,Tant Hill watermelon & jalapeno


The Feast

Thai Beef Salad
with Sequatchie Cove beef, Pocket Farm eggplant & peppers,
 and backyard thai basil

Tomato Pie
with Sequatchie Cove tomatoes, Coppinger cheese, 
Sonrisa whole wheat flour in buttermilk biscuit crust

Marinated Fall Creek Farm Cucumbers
With Crabtree summer squash



To Finish

Crabtree Farm Butternut Mousse
with vanilla rye cookie



Featuring (and Many Thanks to)…. 


All beautiful and colorful wine and water glasses are made by Prentice Hicks and donated for use during this dinner.  They can be taken home to drink from and brighten your every day.  They are 2nds and specially priced.  Please ask for prices


Awesome mugs/beautiful vases, plates and some serving bowls are made by Anderson Bailey, and are also donated for use during this dinner. They are the elegant, mostly white pieces.  They too can be taken home.  Please ask for prices.


Of course this dinner would have been nothing but empty plates and stomachs without our dedicated and hardworking farmers and food artisans- Tant Hill Farm, Crabtree Farm, Fall Creek Farm, Sequatchie Cove Farm and Creamery, Circle S Farm were all extremely important in the making of this dinner.  They are all at Main Street Farmer’s Market- along with many other farms producing equally delicious produce and meat.


Thanks to our gracious hosts Jessica, Andrew, and Montgomery Gage for sharing their beautiful space with all of us.


 And last, but decidedly not least- Many thanks to all of you- the  supporters of local farmers and craftspeople.  You choose to make this community better and more alive every day.  I look forward to seeing you all at the Main Street Farmers Market throughout the season


Saturday, July 21, 2012

Tomato Pie

Although the original recipe called for a pie dish- I first used a spring form pan, only to realize that even that was unnecessary.  The buttermilk biscuit crust is strong enough to hold in the tomatoes, freestyle- all on its own.  Make sure you give the dough time to chill- it is much easier to work with.


for the crust:
  • 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat (or whole rye) flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 6 Tablepoons chilled, unsalted butter
  • 1 cup buttermilk or keifer
for the filling: 
  • 2 pounds ripe tomatoes, cut into 1/4 inch slices
  • 2 1/2 cups shredded Cumberland cheese (or chedder)
  • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese
  • 1 scallion, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup cream
  • 1 Tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tablespoon cornmeal
Make dough for crust: Rub the the butter into the flour, salt, and powders with your fingers until it resembles a coarse meal, with some small chunks of butter.  Gently stir in the buttermilk, either with your hand or a fork.  Knead very briefly, until the dough just comes together.  Form into a ball, wrap with plastic, and chill in fridge for at least an hour

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.  Layer the tomato slices between a clean kitchen towel.  Let sit about 20 minutes to dry.  

Unwrap the dough and very gently roll out into a 11 inch circle.  Use flour if you need to, but keep it at a minimum.  The key is to work very quickly, and don't press to hard as you roll.  If you lift the dough often and lightly flour it, it should roll easily.    Place dough circle on a baking sheet- or in a pie dish.  Stir together vinegar, scallion, salt, and cream. Mix the cheeses together- reserving 1/4 cup for the top.

Sprinkle cornmeal on the bottom of the circle, if in a pie dish, or in a 9inch circle, if just free-form.  Sprinkle about 1/2 cup of cheese, top with about 1/3 of the tomato slices, drizzle with about 1/2 of the cream mixture, top with cheese, more tomatoes, and the rest of the cream.  Top with the rest of the cheese, the rest of the tomato slices, and then sprinkle the reserved 1/4 cup cheese on top. Top with freshly ground pepper.   If you are doing this freeform, just keep piling the filling up, making sure to leave about a 2 inch border.  

Fold the edges over the filling.  If you are not using a pie pan, make sure they are securly crimped and folded, to keep the crust from falling open and the filling leaking out.  

Bake til crust is golden and cheese is brown and bubbly- about 35 minutes.  Let cool at least an hour or two before eating.  


Thursday, July 12, 2012

Two Great Things are Just About to Happen


COME AND LISTEN (and eat fermented food)! On Thursday July 19th, one week from today,  Sandor Katz is coming to Chattanooga to talk about his new book The Art of Fermentation.  Afterwards, there will be fermentation sampling and mingling.  More information here: slowfoodchattanooga.com



COME AND SEE (and buy fun, fancy, and functional stuff)!  On Saturday July 21st, Artifact will be hosting a Wearable Show, as well as an open-studio.  I will be contributing a small amount of my own wearables.  There will be iced tea, and piles of summery clothes and accessories, as well as prints, paintings, and pots.  More information here: http://teamartifact.com/


Thursday, July 5, 2012

Pickling Right Along


Also adapted from Canning For a New Generation come the not-too-sweet bread and butter zucchini pickles.  She uses ginger in her recipe, but I didn't have any.  It sounds super good, but I couldn't wait so I did without.  I also added a little more sugar (but not much) and a little less turmeric (because I ran out).   One jar didn't seal, so, unlike the turnips, I can assure you with all certainty that these pickles are delicious.  They go perfectly with a little rye bread and Dancing Fern cheese.  And, they're made from zucchini.





Bread and Butter Zucchini Pickles
makes about 6 pints
takes 2 days, or one very long day (8 hr-overnight ice bath)

  • 4 pounds zucchini, washed and beheaded
  • 1 pound sweet onions, peeled and halved
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 Tablespoon kosher or pickling salt 
  • 2 Tablespoons whole coriander seeds
  • 1 Tablespoon whole yellow mustard seed
  • 2 teaspoons crushed pepper (or 1 teaspoon minced dried cayenne)
  • 6 cups cider vinegar (5% acidity)
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • (6 rounds fresh ginger if you have it)
Cut zucchini into 1/4 inch rounds.  Thinly slice onions.  Place together in a large bowl and toss with 1/4 cup of salt.  Cover with a healthy layer of ice cubes and let sit in the refrigerator 8 hours, or overnight.  Pull out any unmelted ice cubes, drain, rinse well, and drain again.  Toss with coriander seed and pepper flakes, set aside.  

Sterilize clean jars in a canning pot of boiling water, and let jars sit in warm water while preparing the vinegar.
Place new jar lids in a heat-proof bowl and pour boiling water from the pot over them- also leave in water til needed.

Combine vinegar, water, sugar, turmeric, and 1 T salt in a pot.  Bring to a boil.  Drain the jars and gently stuff the zucchini in, being sure not to pack too tightly.  If using ginger, throw a slice in the bottom of each jar first.  Carefully ladle or pour vinegar into each jar, leaving about 1/2 inch headspace.  Run a clean chopstick around the side of each jar to remove large air bubbles- the zucchini tend to fold up against the sides and trap air in them.  Screw the lids on well, but not too well (til "finger tight"), and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.  Place on a dry towel and don't move jars for 12 hours.  Check to make sure all are sealed (buttons on top will be popped down), and store in a cool dry place.  They can be eaten after 3 weeks, although I tried my unsealed jar after 1 week and they were still amazing.



Monday, June 18, 2012

O, Just Some More Turnips

Mike didn't use all the turnips for kimchi- mostly because we were worried about all-turnip kimchi (unfounded fear), so I've put some up in vinegar.  It's too early to say how they rival the turnip kimchi- but they smelled good, and look great in my hoard.

This has been adapted from Canning For a New Generation by Liana Krissoff- a book that is as good as its name.



Cumin and Paprika Pickled Turnips
about 4 pints

takes 2 days to make, as turnips have to brine for at least 8 hrs (for those of you, like me, who don't read recipes through before you begin chopping)

  • 3 pounds of turnips (I used purple top and hakuri), washed, peeled, and cut into 1/2 inch-wide sticks
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 teaspoon kosher or pickling salt
  • juice of 1 organic lemon, plus chopped rind of same lemon
  • 3 teaspoons ground cumin (or 4 t whole cumin seed)
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1/2 inch of dried cayenne (I've had mine hanging for 2 years, and 1/2-an-inch-at-a-time is not the quickest way to work through them)
  • 3 cups cider vinegar, plus 1 cup water
Put turnips in a large bowl.  Dissolve the 1/4 cup salt in 1 quart of water and pour over turnips.  Place a plate on top to keep all the turnips submerged and brine at room temperature for 8-10 hours, or overnight.  Drain and rinse the turnips, and then toss with spices and lemon juice and rind.

Sterilize 4 pint jars in a canning pot of boiling water.  Leave jars in hot water while you heat the vinegar, 1 cup of water, and the remaining 1 teaspoon of salt in a medium saucepan (as I write this I am becoming increasingly worried that I added 1 tablespoon of salt instead, and that these pickles might just make better shelf ornaments than taco topping).  Bring vinegar just to a boil.

Place new jar lids in a heat-proof bowl, and pour boiling water over them- either from a kettle, or the canning pot.*  Sterilize tongs, a jar lifter, your canning funnel, and a ladle (unless you've already used it to ladle water on the lids) in the boiling canning pot.  You may need to remove the jars first: lift them out with tongs, pouring all the hot water back into the pot.

Working rather quickly, loosely pack the turnips into the jars, to the bottom of the screw-top point (about 3/4 inch from the top).  Ladle or pour the vinegar though a canning funnel over the turnips, leaving 1/2 inch headspace.   Wipe jar rims with a clean damp paper towel, if needed.  Poke a clean chopstick down around the sides of each jar to remove any large air bubbles. Place lids on top of jars, and tighten lightly.  Return jars to pot make sure they are covered by at least 1 inch of water, bring back to a boil, cover pot, and boil (or 'process') for 15 minutes.  Lift jars from pot and place on a wooden cutting board or a dish towel.  Do not disturb for 12 hours.  Put any unsealed jars (the ones whose button on the lid didn't pop down) into the fridge, and enjoy after about 3 weeks.   Place the sealed, labeled jars in a cool, dry, dark place and admire them from time-to-time.

*I used to boil the lids for about 5 minutes, but Canning For a New Generation advises against this, as it can break down the seal on the lid and make it less, or not, effective.  


Monday, May 28, 2012

He's Gone Mad....

Radio Lab podcast about guts, wherein lactic acid in the gut as a result from eating fermented foods (or probiotic pills) is sorta proven to have a direct effect on mood in a positive way, inspired Mike to capture soon-to-be-out-of-season veggies in a delicious fermented brine.    Although Mike himself  was too grossed out by guts to actually make it to that part of the podcast, I filled him in.  Which led us to realize we could do with just a bit more kimchee....

Now radishes, kohlrabi, turnips, snap peas, napa cabbage and beets will live for many months in our jars and guts, helping us to live happier and healthier lives.


And we haven't even got Sandor's new book yet.....

Wednesday, May 9, 2012



Cinco de Mayo on the Ridge
May 5th 2012

To Start

Handmade Tortillitas
With Sequatchie Cove Farm sour cream and scallions 
and William’s Island and Crabtree Farm  radishes

Baked Empanadas
 With Fall Creek Farm broccoli

 Spiced Peanuts and Almonds
With Signal Mtn Farm dried cayenne and herbs from my own yard


......
Garbanzo Bisque
With Sequatchie Cove scallions and kale


The Feast

Creekridge Farm Chicken Mole
With last summer’s Pocket farm tomatoes, 
and chocolate from the farmer’s market in Dominica


Broccoli and Kohlrabi Enchiladas
Topped with Sequatchie Cove Creamery’s Dancing Fern

Pinto and Red Beans
With Riverview Farm corn flour dumplings

Fall Creek Farm Cabbage Slaw
    With Crabtree radishes


To Finish

Corn Cake
 With coconut milk, Sequatchie Cove Farm eggs and last summer’s corn; 
drizzled with a Velo coffee and Dominica nutmeg syrup





Featuring (and Many Thanks to)…. 

All beautiful and colorful wine and water glasses are made by Prentice Hicks and donated for use during this dinner.  They can be taken home to drink from and brighten your every day.  They are 2nds and specially priced.  Please ask for prices

Several small plates and a few larger ones, , and some serving bowls are made by Anderson Bailey, and are also donated for use during this dinner. They are the elegant, mostly white pieces.  They too can be taken home.  Please ask for prices.

Flowers are from my own yard, lovingly and beautifully arranged by Jennie Bartoletti

Of course this dinner would have been nothing but empty plates and stomachs without our dedicated and hardworking farmers and food artisans- William’s Island Farm, Sequatchie Cove Farm and Creamery, Signal Mountain Farm, Crabtree Farm, Circle S Farm, Pocket Farm, Riverview Farm, Creekridge Farm, and Fall Creek Farm were all extremely important in the making of this dinner.  They are all at Main Street Farmer’s Market- along with many other farms producing equally delicious produce and meat.


 And last, but decidedly not least- Many thanks to all of you- the  supporters of local farmers and craftspeople.  You choose to make this community better and more alive every day.  I look forward to seeing you all at the Main Street Farmers Market throughout the season!

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Spring at Artifact



To Start

 Pimento Cheese
With Sequatchie Cove Creamery Cumberland and last summer’s tomatoes


            Served with Fall Creek Farms Cauliflower, Sequatchie Cove Farm Brocliettes,
         William’s Island Farm carrots and Niedlov’s baguette

Spring Rolls
With Williams Island carrots and broccoli flowers and 
Sequatchie Cove cilantro pesto and radishes

Sequatchie Cove Devil’s Eggs
dyed with pickled beet juice
......
Alexzanna Farm Nettle Soup
With Fall Creek Farm potatoes and Sequatchie Cove onions

The Feast

Sequatchie Cove Farm Pork Shoulder
Braised with Williams Island carrots

Roasted Fall Creek Farm Potatoes
With Circle S Farm rutabagas

Spring Salad
With Tant Hill asian greens and Circle S lettuce

Chilled Black Eyed Peas
    With kale from Alexzanna Farm and Tant Hill

To Finish

Muscadine Squares
With handmade muscadine juice 
and flowers from Steve’s mum’s yard



Featuring (and Many Thanks to)….

All beautiful and colorful wine and water glasses are made by Prentice Hicks and donated for use during this dinner.  They can be taken home to drink from and brighten your every day.  They are 2nds and specially priced.  Please ask for prices

Cute and pretty tea cups, a few plates, small bud vases, and some serving bowls are made by Anderson Bailey, and are also donated for use during this dinner. They are the elegant, mostly white pieces.  They too can be taken home, inquire for prices.

Of course this dinner would have been nothing but empty plates and stomachs without our dedicated and hardworking farmers and food artisans- William’s Island Farm, Sequatchie Cove Farm and Creamery, Circle S Farm, Tant Hill Farm,  and Fall Creek Farm were all extremely important in the making of this dinner.  They are all at MainStreet Farmer’s Market- along with many other farms producing equally delicious produce and meat.

Thanks to our gracious hosts for opening the doors of their beautiful studio and letting us enjoy it for the evening.

 And last, but decidedly not least- Many thanks to all of you- the  supporters of local farmers and craftspeople.  You choose to make this community better and more alive every day.  I look forward to seeing you all at the Main Street Farmers Market throughout the season-which never ends!


* Thanks to the lovely Elspeth Schulze for the photos as well




Sunday, March 25, 2012

St Patrick's Day Menu


March 17th 2012

To Start
 Lamb and Pork Pâté
With Sequatchie Cove Farm lamb and pork liver  and Link 41 back bacon

Brown Soda Bread
    With Sonrisa Farms whole rye flour and Sequatchie Cove Farm buttermilk

Served with Sequatchie Cove’s  Cumberland and Grutli cheeses,
 Fall Creek Farms cauliflower and broccoli, and William’s Island Farm baby carrots

 Latkes
With Fall Creek farm russet potatoes, served with last summer’s sweet pepper relish
......
Fall Creek Farm Potato and Leek Soup
With William’s Island beet greens and Circle S Farm rutabaga

The Feast

Sequatchie Cove Farm Corned Beef Brisket
With Sautéed Fall Creek Farm nappa cabbage, 
William’s Island Farm baby carrots and handmade red sauerkraut

Colcannon
With Fall Creek Farm potatoes and William’s Island Farm kale and collards

Belly, Bangers, and Beans
With brined Sequatchie Cove Farm pork belly and Link 41 sausages, 

Fresh Green Salad
With Circle S Farm lettuces and herbs, Sequatchie Cove Farm spinach, 
and William’s Island Farm carrots

To Finish

Porter Cake
and Louisiana Satsumas from last fall


Featuring (and Many Thanks to)….

All beautiful and colorful wine and water glasses are made by Prentice Hicks and donated for use during this dinner.  They can be taken home to drink from and brighten your every day.  They are 2nds and specially priced.  Please ask for prices

Cute and pretty tea cups that held your tortellini, a few plates, small bud vases, and some serving bowls are made by Anderson Bailey, and are also donated for use during this dinner. They are the elegant, mostly white pieces.  They too can be taken home.  Please ask for prices.


Of course this dinner would have been nothing but empty plates and stomachs without our dedicated and hardworking farmers and food artisans- William’s Island Farm, Sequatchie Cove Farm and Creamery, Circle S Farm, Sonrisa Farms,  and Fall Creek Farm were all extremely important in the making of this dinner.  They are all at Main Street Farmer’s Market- along with many other farms producing equally delicious produce and meat.

Thanks to our gracious hosts Justin and Kelly for opening the doors of their beautiful home and letting us enjoy it for the evening.

 And last, but decidedly not least- Many thanks to all of you- the  supporters of local farmers and craftspeople.  You choose to make this community better and more alive every day.  I look forward to seeing you all at the Main Street Farmers Market throughout the season-which never ends!


Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Yesterday








 First day of spring felt a whole lot like summer.  But I'll take it.  As long as it keeps it up......

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Slim Pickins


Tuesday nights are rough. They're the last night before market.  We find ourselves scraping the bottom of the produce drawer, plucking out wilted nappa leaves and the small, scorned, but suddenly valuable radishes.   But beans and rice make those meager offerings go a long way, and last summer's relishes sure don't hurt.  And thanks to Anderson Bailey, we can still eat in style, even if it is small bowlfuls.


Tuesday Night Beans and Rice
for 2 folks, with leftovers for tacos or salad

it's always best to plan ahead for these, because dried beans are so much cheaper.  Soak 'em the night before, or cook a ton and freeze them.

  • 2 cups dried beans (black or red are favorites around here), soaked overnight
  • Water to cover beans
  • 1 1/2 cup rice, white or brown (brown takes longer)
  • 3 cups water, and salt to taste
  • Various and sundry toppings, whatever you've got, chopped into sprinkle-able pieces and placed into small bowls
  • Hot sauce or vinegar for drizzle 
Cook the beans til soft, with a few cumin seeds and garlic cloves, about 40 minutes to 1 hour.  Add salt to taste when the beans are almost done.  Adding it too early can make the skins tough, but you want to give them a little time to become salted.  

Brown rice takes about 40 minutes, while white only takes 15.  Bring rice and 3 cups water to a boil with a little salt.  Turn down to a gentle simmer, cover, and cook til the water has been absorbed, restraining yourself from frequent peeking.

Prepare your toppings during all of this.  Lettuce is always nice, or any kind of Raw and Crunchy.  Nappa cabbage is wonderful this time of year, super sweet and crunchy.  Grated cheese, of course, is wonderful, as well as sour cream.  Relishes and pickles are important to have on hand at all times, so focus on putting those up this coming summer (if you didn't do that last summer).   Fermented veggies like kraut or kimchee are always welcome.

This time we had: thinly sliced nappa, chopped cilantro, cabbage relish from last fall, pepper and onion relish, and Cumberland cheese (grate it on the small holes and it makes it seem like you have more).

To serve, I like to do a layer of rice, then the cheese to make sure it gets melted, then beans, plus everything else, and a drizzle of balsamic vingear and hot sauce.  Then I mix it all up and eat it. 




Thursday, March 8, 2012

Rocketing Toward Spring Tacos

Well, we might not be there yet, but it's close.  Not much has changed at the market, except for a few flowers on the bok choy, but the mocking bird clan outside my window has been telling me, in several bird-languages
(and a few cell phone rings), that change is in the air.



What better day than Market Day, when you arrive home with bounty, to make veggie tacos? 


 A teeny bowl of teeny Tant Hill radishes give the perfect crunch and bite, and of course you need some Sequatchie Cove cheeses.


Turnips, rutabaga, and kale.  Add some cumin seed to that and you're practically in Mexico.




Tuesday, March 6, 2012

trout lily






life's not always about food

Sunday, February 12, 2012

Indian Dinner
February 11th 2012


To Start

Chickpea Littles
With Tant Hill Farm Spinach

Pocket Farm Cabbage
Wrapped with Lentils and Quinoa

Indian Pancakes
With Pocket Farm Scallions

Served with Cilantro Chutney
&
Curried Tomato Chutney

......
Sonrisa Farm Wheat Berry Soup
With William’s Island Turnip Greens and Rutabaga


The Feast

Sweet Dal
With Last Summer’s Tomatoes

Sweet & Sour Potatoes
With Fall Creek Farm’s Potatoes & Cauliflower

Curried Beets And Mushrooms
With William’s Island Farm Beets and Rutabagas, 
Oyster Mushrooms from Walden’s Peak

Collard & Cabbage Paneer
With William’s Island Farm Collards, Tant Hill Cabbage 
and Handmade Paneer

Also: Sonrisa flour Naan, very un-local mango chutney,
 Pocket Farm Spinach and SCF yogurt Raita, very spicy cayenne sauce, and brown rice

To Finish

Rice Pudding
With last summer's Sequatchie Cove Figs
And Louisiana Satsumas


Featuring (and Many Thanks to)….

All beautiful and colorful wine and water glasses are made by Prentice Hicks and donated for use during this dinner.  They can be taken home to drink from and brighten your every day.  They are 2nds and specially priced.  Please ask for prices

Cute and pretty tea cups that held your soup, a few plates, small bud vases, and some serving bowls are made by Anderson Bailey, and are also donated for use during this dinner. They are the elegant, mostly white pieces and are all available for purchase. Please ask for prices.

The flowers are from the yards of Chattanooga and were lovingly arranged by Daisy and Jennie.


Of course this dinner would have been nothing but empty plates and stomachs without our dedicated and hardworking farmers and food artisans- William’s Island Farm, Sequatchie Cove Farm and Creamery, Sonrisa Farm, Pocket Farm, Tant Hill Farm, and Fall Creek Farm were all extremely important in the making of this dinner.  They are all at Main Street Farmer’s Market- along with many other farms producing equally delicious produce and meat.

Thanks to our gracious hosts Steve and Daisy for opening the doors of their beautiful home and letting us enjoy it for the evening.

 And last, but decidedly not least- Many thanks to all of you- the  supporters of local farmers and craftspeople.  You choose to make this community better and more alive every day.  I look forward to seeing you all at the Main Street Farmers Market throughout the season-which never ends!